| Home | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact Us
top_img
J Korean Soc Ther Radiol Oncol > Volume 17(1); 1999 > Article
The Journal of the Korean Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1999;17(1): 9-15.
Combined Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Limited Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer
Moon Kyung Kim, Yong Chan Ahn, Keunchil Park, Do Hoon Lim, Seung Jae Huh, Dae Yong Kim, Kyung Hwan Shin, Kyu Chan Lee, O Jung Kwon
1Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.
2Division of Hematology-oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.
3Division of Pulmonology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.
ABSTRACT
PURPOSE:
This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Forty-six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method.
RESULTS:
The median follow-up period was 16 months (range : 2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombocytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The overall and progression-free survival rates were 79% and 55% in 1 year, and 45% and 32% in 2 years, respectively, and the median survival was 23 months.
CONCLUSION:
Relatively satisfactory local control and survival rates were achieved after the combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy with mild to moderate acute morbidities in limited disease small cell lung cancer.
Key Words: Small-cell lung cancer, Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy
Editorial Office
Department of Radiation Oncology,
Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine,
81 Irwon-Ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06351, Korea
TEL: +82-2-3410-2612  E-mail: rojeditor@gmail.com
Copyright © The Korean Society for Radiation Oncology. All rights reserved.                      developed in m2community
Close layer
prev next